The Beatles: Eight Days a Week

Beatles 101 for the post-Anthology generation

The story never gets old: four talented working-class boys jump on a nascent musical movement and ride off on a world-conquering hero’s journey filled with joy, brotherhood, tragedy and triumph. For over 50 years, the details of this story have been forensically sifted through by fans, critics, scholars and detractors to the point where seemingly nothing new could be said about the Beatles and their music. So what is the point of a Beatles documentary in 2016, aside from presenting a fresh take by a first-rate director? Aside from educating a new generation on the genius and integrity of the band, Ron Howard’s The Beatles: Eight Days a Week turns out to be as fun and affecting as its subject matter.

Featuring candid and affectionate new interviews with surviving members Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr (as well as miscellaneous historians, musicians, and celebrities), the film focuses mainly on their hectic and often chaotic touring life from the early to mid-‘60s, before Beatlemania turned sour and led the foursome to an inspired, but insulated studio existence.

While worthy of a documentary of its own, the formative Hamburg/Cavern years are fast-forwarded through in order to get to Howard’s real focus: the Beatles’ impact on American culture, beginning with their arrival at JFK International Airport in February of 1964 amidst fan and press hysteria before taking the stage for their legendary appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show. Unbeknownst to most of the 73 million viewers who tuned in to the performance, the Beatles were already polished and road-hardened veterans of their craft, as capable and charming in press conferences as on stage. Along with their unique appearance, this gave them an otherworldly aura before their true legend as first-rank artists even took root.

From there, the documentary speeds through its 2 hours and 18 minutes in a blur of energetic performances (many unearthed for the first time), had-to-be-there-to-understand fandom, and warmhearted commentary. Howard places this in proper context, with many of the tumultuous cultural shifts of the ‘60s (the Kennedy assassination, the Vietnam War, the civil rights movement) providing a tense backdrop for the escapism of Beatlemania. The band not only shaped the times, but were very much shaped by the times, which goes a long way in explaining why their impact has never been fully replicated since.

It’s almost incomprehensible how much artistic growth and life experience the Beatles managed to compress in the short amount of time covered by this documentary. In the span of 7 years, the music went from innocent, joyful pop to avant-garde surrealism, just as the group morphed from cheeky, suited-up mop tops to world-weary hippie wise men. If you were to write it as fiction, no one would believe it. As it stands, it did happen and this film is concrete proof (in addition to all of the other luck that surrounded the band throughout its journey, they were the most well-documented entertainers of their time). There is still nothing comparable to the phenomenon of Beatlemania at its peak. Their value as artists and entertainers is largely unquestioned. As we learn in The Beatles: Eight Days a Week, the human beings behind the myth were equally worthy of the adoration.

 

The Beatles: Eight Days a Week is currently streaming on Hulu and will be available on DVD and Blu-ray on November 18.

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