Review: You Want It Darker – Leonard Cohen

Another tablet of grim mortality and haunting beauty from the master

Continuing a late-career renaissance that began with his return to the concert stage in 2008, Leonard Cohen is redefining the creative life span of the singer-songwriter. At 82, Cohen has just released his latest album You Want It Darker, a collection teeming with poetic, bittersweet power.  Following 2012’s excellent Old Ideas and 2014’s solid Popular Problems, Cohen continues to delve deeper into his obsessions (spirituality, mortality, relationships gone wrong) with the unwavering eyes of a man who knows his time is running out.

The album opens with the title track, an instantly classic Cohen meditation that manages to sound atmospheric, sinister, and sensual all at once. Cohen’s voice is now far removed from the one that was featured quite meekly on 1967’s Songs of Leonard Cohen.  His gravelly baritone now carries the weight of deep authority and hard-earned wisdom. It is not for everyone and certainly not a Top 40 staple, but it’s become a distinctive signature that fully compliments his writing style. When he sings “I’m ready my Lord,” with the gravity and resignation so clear in his delivery, it is like the encapsulation of his entire body of work and personal quest.

Produced by his son Adam, along with longtime collaborator Patrick Leonard, You Want It Darker benefits from simple, tasteful arrangements that wisely place Cohen’s voice and poetry front-and-center. Each song is ruminative in a way only Cohen can pull off: the sacred and the suffering all delivered with biting wit as on “Leaving the Table,” where he bids adieu to his infamous ladies’ man persona with the words “I don’t need a lover/The wretched beast is tame.” On “Treaty,” he owns up to the existential angst of his years by admitting “I’m angry and I’m tired all the time.”  This is not easy listening, but that is not what the Cohen faithful seek.

Along with the pervasive gloom (or simply the mood of mortality now fully felt and expressed), Cohen also writes with characteristically heartbreaking beauty: “If I Didn’t Have Your Love” may be about a lover or about God (or both), but the haunting images of desolation and darkness only serve to underscore how lost the singer would be “if I didn’t have your love to make it real.” As on the album cover, Cohen might be ready to step into the light, but he still has one arm draped over the darkness. If You Want It Darker is Cohen’s final artistic statement, it is a faithful and uncompromising summation of all that has come before and a shining inspiration to any artist in search of longevity and relevance well into seniority.

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