Concert Review – Paul McCartney live at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre

At a spry and still-boyish 75, Sir Paul McCartney brought his career-spanning One on One tour to Tinley Park, IL for two shows this summer (and first-ever visit to the area). Of course, Beatle devotees could have easily filled a concert venue three times the size of Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, so it was a curious choice, though McCartney has been in the habit of visiting new places in recent years. A born showman, music and performing are in his DNA. This becomes abundantly clear when watching him perform. He obviously still loves what he does and basks in the interaction with his audience. And though he’s joked about one day being wheeled onstage to croak out yet another rendition of “Yesterday,” it is almost certain McCartney will keep playing for fans as long as he is physically able to.

Again, one can recite all of McCartney’s superhuman accomplishments ad nauseam. Along with Prince, he is perhaps the most musically gifted pop artist of all time. Had he been nothing more than the pretty pin-up idol who played all those amazing basslines on Beatle records, his legend would still rest assured. The fact that he was also a mutli-instrumentalist with a voice that could sing ballads and rockers with ease, as well as being one-half of the greatest songwriting partnership of all time is surreal. He’s been almost too good his entire career. He spoiled his audience with his genius at an incredibly young age and must now carry that weight (of expectation) a long time.

Even this he does with supreme grace. During the second of the two Tinley shows, McCartney opened with “A Hard Day’s Night”. A blinding spotlight caused him to miss his microphone stand, so he quickly stopped the show and, lifelong pro that he is, immediately charmed the audience with the offhand quip, “Hey, it’s live!” and started the show again. So we got to hear the iconic opening chord twice, which can only be a good thing. Once Paul’s voice kicked in, it was Beatlemania all over again for those in attendance.

McCartney followed up with a rocking “Junior’s Farm” from peak-era Wings, and then another early Beatles favorite, “Can’t Buy Me Love” and “Jet” from the classic Band on the Run album. All were delivered with great energy and the sound mix was excellent throughout. He also threw in an obscure (but well known among DJ’s) solo track “Temporary Secretary” from 1980’s synth-heavy McCartney II. Again, McCartney had to stop the show as the sequencer sample that starts the song was off-rhythm. And again McCartney joked that this was how the audience knew for sure that the band was really playing live. Having seen McCartney many times since he returned to regular touring in 1989, the early flubs added a refreshing spontaneity to what is normally a tightly-scripted and highly-polished show.

While McCartney has indeed lost part of his legendary upper register with age (as have virtually all rock veterans still on the touring circuit), he still delivered vocal moments that brought the house down. At one point near the end of “1985,” he nailed the signature belt and got rapturous cheers. Having shown up at the venue before the gates opened, I was able to hear his pre-show sound check of about 9 or 10 songs not in the regular set. All of them sounded great and his voice was still strong and commanding. For other songs in the set, the sound mix and great vocal harmonies, particularly from drummer Abe Laboriel Jr., made up the difference.

For all of his storybook achievements, McCartney still carries himself as a working musician. Touring with the same band he has since 2001, he works much, much harder than he has to. He hustles and sweats. As a living Beatle, McCartney could do the Dylan thing and come onstage, stoic and aloof, and go through the motions of a self-serving set list without any audience engagement. Most people would still go home happy knowing they got to see him and the iconic Höfner bass. Instead, McCartney takes you on a journey through music history with stories about Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton, the impetus for certain songs, as well as loving tributes to Linda McCartney, Beatles producer George Martin, George Harrison and John Lennon. He also swaps back and forth between bass, electric and acoustic guitar, piano and ukulele (as a great tribute to Harrison on “Something”). It was an impressive display of his unmatched talent.

For an epic three-hour show, the pace flew by. There was an easy blend of moods and tones, from classic rockers to stately piano ballads and a nice acoustic interlude where McCartney played with casual flair as if in your living room or at the local coffee house. After the acoustic set, which included Beatle classics “And I Love Her,” “Blackbird,” and Quarrymen charmer “In Spite of All the Danger,” McCartney and company went back into full-band mode for the final third of the show that played like a jukebox loaded with the greatest of greatest hits: “Eleanor Rigby,” “Band on the Run,” “Let it Be,” pyrotechnic showstopper “Live and Let Die,” and audience sing along “Hey Jude”. The man’s back catalog  simply cannot be beat.

As if the set list was not generous enough, McCartney came back for an encore that played like a full show in itself: “Yesterday,” “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise),” “Hi Hi Hi,” “Get Back,” and the majestic Abbey Road finale “Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight/The End” which climaxed with a blistering three-way guitar dual between McCartney, Rusty Anderson, and Brain Ray and perhaps McCartney’s greatest couplet, “And in the end, the love you take/Is equal to the love you make”.  As the final A chord reverberated from his sunburst Les Paul, the medley’s conclusion pretty much summed up the unflagging energy and optimism he’s radiated throughout his storybook career.

As the key custodian of the Beatles legacy, Paul McCartney gives his audience far more than they can reasonably expect from him at 75. His onstage energy and generosity of spirit continue to shine brightly. Of the four Beatles, he was always the most outgoing and eager to please, characteristics that have often made him an easy target for critics and certain rock purists. But there has never been an easy way to deny his staggering talent. Someone with his level of popularity will always polarize the public. The true legacy lies in the songs; anthems of peace, hope, compassion and love. Listen to what the man said.

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