Echo in the Canyon (Blu-ray) – The NO B.S., Spoiler-Free, One-Paragraph Review

Tired of all the long-winded, unreliable nonsense on Rotten Tomatoes? Here’s all you need to know in 1 minute.

As sunny and idealized as you’d imagine a documentary on the mid-60’s Laurel Canyon music scene to be. Brimming with the youth, beauty, and prodigious talent of the era, this serves as both an affectionate tribute and handing of the torch thanks to the larger vision of director Andrew Slater and time capsule tour guide Jakob Dylan. Part of Echo in the Canyon features interviews with luminaries such as Brian Wilson, Roger McGuinn, David Crosby, Jackson Browne, Michelle Phillips, and other legends of the period (or those influenced by them, such as the last on-camera interview with the late, reverential Tom Petty). Another part showcases contemporary talent such as Beck, Norah Jones, and Cat Power interpreting peerless songs from the Byrds, Beach Boys, and Buffalo Springfield. The combination works well, illuminating the ripple effect of a bygone sonic and philosophical sensibility that will not be matched anytime soon. Echo in the Canyon shimmers as brightly as the twang of a 12-string Rickenbacker.  As for the Blu-ray version, I would have easily rated it a Purchase, but did not due to the total absence of extras (which this release was ripe for).

Final Rating:

Purchase

Rent

Use disc as coaster

Concert Review – Phil Collins gives fans One More Night at the United Center

Coming out of retirement has been one of the longest-running clichés in show business history. Many rock performers have even turned it into a running gag with “farewell” tours that clearly capitalize on the goodwill of fans (The Eagles’ Final Farewell 1 and Ozzy Osbourne’s No More Tours II both immediately come to mind). For Phil Collins, one of only three musicians in history to sell 100+ million albums both as part of a group and as a solo artist (the other two being Paul McCartney and Michael Jackson), the motivations clearly ran deeper than money or the glamour of fame. Once a hyperkinetic, eager-to-please performer on stage, Collins has physically been reduced to a frail 67 year old, walking with the assistance of a cane due to back surgery and nerve damage. As Collins himself joked at the start of Monday night’s concert at the United Center (his first since the triumphant Genesis reunion tour of 2007), “Getting old sucks”. It was this kind of self-deprecating charm that went a long way towards bridging the gap between what he once was and what he is today.

Taking the stage alone to a solitary spotlight and greeting the sold-out audience, Collins immediately addressed his physical condition and let everyone know that he would be seated for most of the night. For many who weren’t aware of his ailments, it served as the first surprise of the night, but it also helped establish a unique intimacy and emotional connection that served, rather than hindered, the underlying pathos of most of his best songs. Also, the way Collins chose to bookend the evening was artful and heartrending. Opening with 1984’s “Against All Odds,” the lyrics immediately took on a new poignancy – against all odds, Collins managed to stage this late-career comeback and when he reached the vocal hook “Take a look at me now,” it was a brave statement (much like his recent solo catalogue reissues, which featured updated portraits of his aged visage on the covers in place of the originals).

 

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Both Sides, then and now

 

From there, the stage curtain lifted to reveal Collins’ stellar band for this cheekily-named Not Dead Yet tour (comprised of many longtime collaborators including guitarist Daryl Stuermer, the legendary Leland Sklar on bass, and childhood friend Ronnie Caryl on second guitar) and they immediately segued into the elegant shimmer of “Another Day in Paradise,” with tasteful nylon guitar licks courtesy of Stuermer. The song, like almost all of Collins’ best material, is rich in both mood and tasteful arrangement. And for most of the evening, Collins was in strong voice. Like most touring singers in his age group, there’s been some loss of his uppermost range, but he compensated by dropping the keys of many songs (something he also did during the 2007 Genesis tour) and taking full advantage of four soulful backup vocalists. Otherwise his distinctive, nasally tone still placed an unmistakable stamp on hit-after-vintage-hit (he sounded his absolute best on slower ballads like “Separate Lives” and deep-cut gem “You Know What I Mean”). His natural charisma also served him well throughout the night.

Along with early throwbacks to his very first solo album (1981’s classic Face Value), such as “I Missed Again,” he also slotted in a few Genesis hits like “Throwing it All Away” and “Follow You, Follow Me”. Played back-to-back, the latter two song choices seemed intentionally sequenced as musically, thematically and emotionally, both mirror each other perfectly and have always had a similar heart-tugging effect. Other, more up-tempo album tracks like “Who Said I Would” and “Something Happened on the Way to Heaven” showcased the tour’s stellar horn section (a solo-Collins staple).  The musicianship throughout the entire show was first class and more than made up for Collins’ physical limitations.

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Which brings us to the wild card of the evening. In what could have been a blatant case of pure nepotism, Collins chose his own son Nicholas (or more commonly, Nic) to play his signature drum parts for this tour. His first show was at the age of fourteen as his father slowly re-entered public life back in 2015. It sounded suspect at the time, but in what turned out to be the night’s second biggest surprise, the now 17 year-old Nic Collins stole the show at the United Center. Inheriting his father’s talent on both drums and piano (as well as his onstage energy), Nic proved to be a dynamo all night. He had his father’s unique drum sound and fills down pat and he shone especially bright during the “Drum Trio” portion of the show, where he laid down thunderous rolls with percussionist Richie Garcia. Both drummers eventually joined Collins Sr. at the front of the stage and continued the rhythmic assault on Cajon boxes. It was great to see Phil Collins display his still-expert sense of timing and showmanship. Definitely one of the major highlights of the evening.

After a poignant version of the aforementioned “You Know What I Mean” (with just father and son on stage), the show reached perhaps its emotional climax with the one song everyone bought a ticket for: the still goose bump-inducing “In the Air Tonight”. Having already established Nic Collins as a major player on this tour, his take on the classic drum break in the song (so classic it undoubtedly made his father’s solo career) was necessarily faithful and powerful. It was also the one song Phil Collins bothered to stand for all evening, which perversely added even more drama and theatricality to the performance. The song’s potency remains undiminished.

From that point forward, the show turned into a high-energy, greatest-hits parade with Collins’ classic cover of The Supremes’ “You Can’t Hurry Love,” Genesis’ “Invisible Touch,” his 1984 Philip Bailey duet “Easy Lover,” and the ubiquitous “Sussudio” all garnering the strongest audience responses of the night. By the time he symbolically closed the show with the elegiac “Take Me Home,” Phil Collins had turned a once-sad retirement into a bittersweet victory lap laden with subtle contemplations of aging and loss. It was a brave move, perhaps the boldest of Collins’ legendary career. For all of the syrupy sentimentality and silky-smooth aural sheen of his mid-late solo work, there is real grit to his survival and genuine devotion to his art. Phil Collins is Not Dead Yet and thankfully so.

 

Setlist:

  1. Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now)
  2. Another Day in Paradise
  3. I Missed Again
  4. Hang in Long Enough
  5. Throwing It All Away
  6. Follow You Follow Me
  7. Can’t Turn Back the Years
  8. Who Said I Would
  9. Separate Lives
  10. You’ll Be in My Heart
  11. Drum Trio
  12. Something Happened on the Way to Heaven
  13. You Know What I Mean
  14. In the Air Tonight
  15. You Can’t Hurry Love
  16. Dance Into the Light
  17. Invisible Touch
  18. Easy Lover
  19. Sussudio

Encore:

  1. Take Me Home

 

Songs I wish he’d played (but didn’t):

  1. I Don’t Care Anymore
  2. Long Long Way to Go
  3. Man on the Corner
  4. That’s Just the Way It Is
  5. I Wish It Would Rain Down
  6. Tonight Tonight Tonight

Concert Review – Paul McCartney live at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre

At a spry and still-boyish 75, Sir Paul McCartney brought his career-spanning One on One tour to Tinley Park, IL for two shows this summer (and first-ever visit to the area). Of course, Beatle devotees could have easily filled a concert venue three times the size of Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, so it was a curious choice, though McCartney has been in the habit of visiting new places in recent years. A born showman, music and performing are in his DNA. This becomes abundantly clear when watching him perform. He obviously still loves what he does and basks in the interaction with his audience. And though he’s joked about one day being wheeled onstage to croak out yet another rendition of “Yesterday,” it is almost certain McCartney will keep playing for fans as long as he is physically able to.

Again, one can recite all of McCartney’s superhuman accomplishments ad nauseam. Along with Prince, he is perhaps the most musically gifted pop artist of all time. Had he been nothing more than the pretty pin-up idol who played all those amazing basslines on Beatle records, his legend would still rest assured. The fact that he was also a mutli-instrumentalist with a voice that could sing ballads and rockers with ease, as well as being one-half of the greatest songwriting partnership of all time is surreal. He’s been almost too good his entire career. He spoiled his audience with his genius at an incredibly young age and must now carry that weight a long time.

Even this he does with supreme grace. During the second of the two Tinley shows, McCartney opened with “A Hard Day’s Night”. A blinding spotlight caused him to miss his microphone stand, so he quickly stopped the show and, lifelong pro that he is, immediately charmed the audience with the offhand quip, “Hey, it’s live!” and started the show again. So we got to hear the iconic opening chord twice, which can only be a good thing. Once Paul’s voice kicked in, it was Beatlemania all over again for those in attendance.

McCartney followed up with a rocking “Junior’s Farm” from peak-era Wings, and then another early Beatles favorite, “Can’t Buy Me Love” and “Jet” from the classic Band on the Run album. All were delivered with great energy and the sound mix was excellent throughout. He also threw in an obscure (but well known among DJ’s) solo track “Temporary Secretary” from 1980’s synth-heavy McCartney II. Again, McCartney had to stop the show as the sequencer sample that starts the song was off-rhythm. And again McCartney joked that this was how the audience knew for sure that the band was really playing live. Having seen McCartney many times since he returned to regular touring in 1989, the early flubs added a refreshing spontaneity to what is normally a tightly-scripted and highly-polished show.

While McCartney has indeed lost part of his legendary upper register with age (as have virtually all rock veterans still on the touring circuit), he still delivered vocal moments that brought the house down. At one point near the end of “1985,” he nailed the signature belt and got rapturous cheers. Having shown up at the venue before the gates opened, I was able to hear his pre-show sound check of about 9 or 10 songs not in the regular set. All of them sounded great and his voice was still strong and commanding. For other songs in the set, the sound mix and great vocal harmonies, particularly from drummer Abe Laboriel Jr., made up the difference.

For all of his storybook achievements, McCartney still carries himself as a working musician. Touring with the same band he has since 2001, he works much, much harder than he has to. He hustles and sweats. As a living Beatle, McCartney could do the Dylan thing and come onstage, stoic and aloof, and go through the motions of a self-serving set list without any audience engagement. Most people would still go home happy knowing they got to see him and the iconic Höfner bass. Instead, McCartney takes you on a journey through music history with stories about Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton, the impetus for certain songs, as well as loving tributes to Linda McCartney, Beatles producer George Martin, George Harrison and John Lennon. He also swaps back and forth between bass, electric and acoustic guitar, piano and ukulele (as a great tribute to Harrison on “Something”). It was an impressive display of his unmatched talent.

For an epic three-hour show, the pace flew by. There was an easy blend of moods and tones, from classic rockers to stately piano ballads and a nice acoustic interlude where McCartney played with casual flair as if in your living room or at the local coffee house. After the acoustic set, which included Beatle classics “And I Love Her,” “Blackbird,” and Quarrymen charmer “In Spite of All the Danger,” McCartney and company went back into full-band mode for the final third of the show that played like a jukebox loaded with the greatest of greatest hits: “Eleanor Rigby,” “Band on the Run,” “Let it Be,” pyrotechnic showstopper “Live and Let Die,” and audience sing along “Hey Jude”. The man’s back catalog  simply cannot be beat.

As if the set list was not generous enough, McCartney came back for an encore that played like a full show in itself: “Yesterday,” “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise),” “Hi Hi Hi,” “Get Back,” and the majestic Abbey Road finale “Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight/The End” which climaxed with a blistering three-way guitar dual between McCartney, Rusty Anderson, and Brain Ray and perhaps McCartney’s greatest couplet, “And in the end, the love you take/Is equal to the love you make”.  As the final A chord reverberated from his sunburst Les Paul, the medley’s conclusion pretty much summed up the unflagging energy and optimism he’s radiated throughout his storybook career.

As the key custodian of the Beatles legacy, Paul McCartney gives his audience far more than they can reasonably expect from him at 75. His onstage energy and generosity of spirit continue to shine brightly. Of the four Beatles, he was always the most outgoing and eager to please, characteristics that have often made him an easy target for critics and certain rock purists. But there has never been an easy way to deny his staggering talent. Someone with his level of popularity will always polarize the public. The true legacy lies in the songs; anthems of peace, hope, compassion and love. Listen to what the man said.

DEJA VU – Roger Waters live at United Center

If I had been God

With my staff and my rod

If I had been given the nod

I believe I could have

Done a better job

– Roger Waters

 

Roger Waters is not a subtle man. That shouldn’t surprise anyone familiar with Pink Floyd albums The Wall and The Final Cut or solo efforts like Amused to Death. While his obsessions drove most of the grand concepts and theatrics the Floyd are so renowned for, they also led to the band’s dissolution. Waters’ vision is so singular and forceful, it alienated fellow Floyd members and upset the band dynamic that gave birth to more organic-sounding albums like The Dark Side of the Moon and Wish You Were Here.  While Waters had already established dominance in the Floyd hierarchy by 1973, it was with the 1977 release of Animals where listeners were exposed to  the overtly political and eviscerating approach that would dominate his work to this day.

Four years after completing his last record-setting world tour (a revival of 1979’s The Wall), Waters is back on the road with another politically-charged and angry show. Though the tour is in support of his latest album, Is This the Life We Really Want?, the themes, motifs and iconography all hark back to Animals. The world’s leaders may be different than in 1977, but the corrosive sociopolitical issues remain the same. All the great injustices of the world that have driven most of Waters’ best work still exist, as does his passionate need to rant about them. And one can make the Floydian/Orwellian argument that society is still made up of “Dogs”, “Pigs”, and “Sheep”.

At 73, Waters retains his ability to both entertain and provoke. His flair for putting on an epic, theatrical and fully immersive experience colors every facet of his live show. While not as awe-inspiring as his last run of Wall concerts, the new Us + Them arena tour is nearly as creative and captivating with some truly big moments. Waters and his team also deserve major credit for dreaming up an entirely different presentation with innovations never before seen, especially during the second half of the concert (yes, Waters actually has an old-school intermission midway through the show).

Opening with Dark Side favorite “Speak to Me/Breathe,” the show eases you in, seducing you with a groove and melody as familiar now as a child’s lullaby. Gone this time around is the legendary, circular “Mr. Screen” familiar to all Floyd fanatics. While missed, Waters again deserves kudos for going in a different visual direction on this tour. Having started the show on a gentle note, Waters and his backing band followed up with the head-banging throb of “One of These Days”. The pulse is still mesmerizing, as are the searing slide parts. It was a great one-two punch to start the show with. From there, the Floyd favorites continued with the still-majestic “Time,” “Breathe (Reprise),” “The Great Gig in the Sky” (featured vocals from lookalike Lucius singers Jess Wolfe and Holly Laessig), and the menacing-as-ever “Welcome to the Machine”. The songs all sounded magnificent, benefitting as usual from the superior surround-sound first pioneered by Pink Floyd in the ‘70s. As an audience member, you truly feel like you are inside the sound and not just having it blasted at you.

As part of a well-thought out set list, Waters then segued into three new songs that shared much of the same sonic palette as what came before. Starting with “Déjà Vu,” which sounds like a sequel to “Wish You Were Here,” Waters finally articulates his God complex with a vocal delivery straight out of The Final Cut. In “Picture That” and “The Last Refugee,” he expresses clear rage at the current political climate, a thread that would continue well into the second half of the show. The new songs all cleverly share strong musical threads with peak-era Floyd, thanks in large part to the production tricks of Nigel Godrich (best known for his work with Radiohead, themselves Floyd devotees). Along with the rest of Is This the Life We Really Want?, these songs make a fitting addition to Waters’ songwriting legacy.

The first half of the show closed with “Wish You Were Here” (as with Gilmour’s last tour, much earlier in the set than one would expect) along with Wall standards “The Happiest Days of Our Lives” and “Another Brick in the Wall” (parts 2 and 3). For the latter, once again Waters brought out a dozen or so youth from a local inner city school to substitute for the bratty English school kids on the album. While a consistent crowd-pleasing moment, their awkward dance choreography is one of the few missteps in the show, veering a little too heavily towards schmaltz.

With that, Waters and co. took a 15 minute intermission. What followed in the second half was to be more confrontational, yet also more visually arresting. Through a very clever set design, several interconnected screens that operated as scrolls dropped down from the top of the arena to magically transform into the iconic Battersea Power Station, bringing the cover of Animals to life, working smoke stacks and all. Always an imposing and oppressive symbol of the Industrial era, Battersea is the central image of the entire Us + Them tour. Having revisited the entirety of both Dark Side and The Wall on his solo tours, his current run is a pseudo-40th anniversary tour of Animals where, once again, what’s old is new. To further drive that point home, the second set began with “Dogs,” complete with a creepy mid-point tea party where the band wore animal masks as if part of some twisted English ball of yore. This was followed by outright, relentless Trump-bashing during “Pigs,” where Waters resorted to some juvenile and over-the-top imagery to symbolize his “resistance” to the current leader of the free world. Again, it was as unsubtle and heavy-handed as one could get while potentially alienating half of his audience, but Waters is one of very few artists breathing rarefied air. He doesn’t have to care if he bruises certain sensibilities in the crowd. You don’t like it? Leave, but don’t forget to buy the t-shirt on your way out.

From there, it was back to Dark Side material with the classic-rock radio staple “Money” and “Us and Them,” songs from 1973 that still powerfully resonate in the present. He slipped in one final new song “Smell the Roses” that easily could have fit on any mid-70s Floyd album, before closing the second half with a stunning version of “Brain Damage/Eclipse” where Waters and his lighting team vividly brought the prismatic Dark Side cover to life. It was an ingenious and brilliant effect to behold.

Waters and his great backing band returned for an encore that started with acoustic-based versions of both “Vera” and “Bring the Boys Back Home” that were really affecting, particularly the latter, removed from The Wall’s more bombastic touches. Finally, the show closed with “Comfortably Numb,” which was to be expected save for the appearance (on the Sunday show) of hometown legend Eddie Vedder to sing the Gilmour vocal parts. It was a genuine surprise that further elevated both the song and the United Center audience. After singing his parts, Vedder strapped on Waters’ trademark black acoustic guitar to help the band bring the song and show home. Sharing as they do a similar artistic and political temperament, the pairing was not as odd as one might think. The affection between the two rock titans was heartfelt, as was the moment itself.

Though he’s been on an amazing touring run since coming back to live performance in 1999, Waters has stated that this may be his final go-around. Sad as it may be to hear (as we only have so many legends of his stature left), Waters has absolutely nothing left to prove. He conquered the world as a young man with Pink Floyd and though he had a rocky start after the group split up, has since triumphed as a solo artist. His was the more challenging path than Gilmour’s, initially relying less on the Floyd brand for survival. But as the wonderfully retro Is This the Life We Really Want? and Us + Them tour make clear, Waters still has a lot to say and the same poetic and conceptual gifts that have captivated rock fans across generations. The lunatic is still on the grass.

The Two Americas – U2 live at Soldier Field

How long must we sing this song? – U2

Thirty years after conquering the world with their fifth studio album The Joshua Tree, U2 are resurrecting the much-beloved late ‘80s rock landmark for another run of stadium shows. While on the surface the concept smacks of a nostalgia-fueled cash grab, the themes U2 first  grappled with in 1987 (particularly of an America divided by infinite potential and its seedy, self-destructive underbelly – hence Joshua’s working title The Two Americas) are perhaps even more resonant in 2017. Never a band to dwell on the past, U2 have re-contextualized the material while staying true to most of the iconic imagery and song arrangements, the end result being a tour of old songs with new things to say.

Another bonus for U2 in revisiting The Joshua Tree live is that they are much more polished stadium performers now, utilizing state-of-the-art visual and sonic elements that didn’t exist in 1987. On that first go around, the band struggled with crude technology along with graduating from an arena band to a multiplatinum monster playing the largest venues possible. The scale was overwhelming for a group built on the idea of inclusion and intimacy with its audience (the ethos imprinted in its very name -You Too). The massive success, including landing on the cover of Time magazine, was tempered by frustration on the road as they came to grips with how to play to audiences of that size.

Fast-forward thirty years and U2 remain one of the top two stadium acts in the world along with the Rolling Stones. The challenges presented by The Joshua Tree and its world-beating success were effectively slayed by the band in 1991 with their second masterpiece Achtung Baby and its accompanying ZooTV tour. A multimedia sensory assault with a humanitarian underpinning (and hailed as “the Sgt. Pepper’s of rock tours” by Robert Hilburn of the Lost Angeles Times), ZooTV set the template for the rest of U2’s stadium presentations including this year’s Joshua Tree victory lap.

As Roger Waters did with his own rebuilding of The Wall in 2010-2013, U2 have managed to strike the right balance between staying true to the original, slightly scaled-back presentation with tastefully updated visuals. At Soldier Field in Chicago, the B stage that was first introduced during their ZooTV run set the mood for an effective opening salvo. Coming to the stage alone, the always-solid Larry Mullen Jr. hammered out the iconic snare opening to “Sunday Bloody Sunday,” as the rest of the band filed out one-by-one to heroic fanfare. The Edge’s signature chime enveloped the stadium air as Bono belted the opening cries. Once Adam Clayton’s bass dropped in during the second verse, the band locked in and established a sonic power that would not let up during most of what followed. There was also no mistaking the new subtext in the song’s opening lines “I can’t believe the news today, I can’t close my eyes and make it go away”. U2 would spend the rest of the night making connections between the sins of the past and the present.

The band followed up with “New Year’s Day,” live rarity “A Sort of Homecoming,” and requisite singalong “Pride”. Having effectively started the evening playing a pseudo club show in the middle of a stadium setting, goodwill was established long before they got to the main course. When they finally did, it was a largely-faithful re-creation of The Joshua Tree, including (thankfully) the original track sequencing. As the classic atmospheric opening to “Where the Streets Have No Name” slowly built and the band moved to the larger stage, the screen backdrop came to life and bathed the audience in incandescent red. Once the Edge’s still chill-inducing arpeggios rang out, the concert everyone came to see began proper. It was classic U2.

Luckily for audiences, The Joshua Tree has one of the greatest triple-track openings in rock history.  After “Streets” came “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” and “With or Without You”. In fact, throw in “Bullet the Blue Sky” and “Running to Stand Still” and you have one of the best sides of vinyl ever. The range of dynamics and emotions in these songs still retain most of their power. Side two, while not as outright impactful, still creates a range of moods that linger, especially the slow-burning “Exit”. They are the deeper cuts in the catalog that even Bono joked the band needed to reacquaint themselves with. It was also the trickier of the two sides to present live (the re-imagined and mellower “Red Hill Mining Town” being perhaps the only key disappointment of the current Joshua set). Had it not been for the context of this tour, the running order of these songs would definitely have been changed by U2. No band would ever close a stadium show with a song as low-key and melancholic as “Mothers of the Disappeared”. It’s the primary challenge of the live versus recorded presentation of The Joshua Tree, but to have rearranged the track sequencing would’ve also stripped much of the potency of the whole concept (and betrayed most audience expectations). Part of the greatness of albums like The Joshua Tree (or Dark Side of the Moon, Nevermind, etc.) is the specific way the songs play off of each other within the context of the greater whole. While rearranging the Joshua set for live dynamics was considered during rehearsals, thankfully it never came to pass.

This brings us to a few of the potentially polarizing factors of this show. First of all, there’s Bono. Certain rock and roll front men, particularly those not tethered to an instrument, tend to be larger-than-life showboats. It’s a large part of what it takes to work a stadium crowd. Bono was a stadium performer while still working the club scene in U2’s formative days. He’s over-earnest, hammy and bombastic, but with an undeniable charisma that keeps you fixated. Like Jagger, his persona is one that now verges on unintentional self-parody at times. But the sincerity of his delivery ultimately wins you over (or not). As for his vocals (another love or hate it signature), for the most part he sounded strong. While his upper-register belting is not as commanding as his late-80s to early-90s peak, he hit his key moments. There were also subtle factors like the sound mix, lowered keys on certain songs, as well as the Edge’s own strong harmonies that helped bolster things on the vocal side. For the most part, no one in that massive Soldier Field audience had cause for complaint. The songs sounded good-to-great, both on the instrumental and vocal front.

The second and potentially more alienating factor was the undeniable political subtext that ran throughout the entire show. U2 have never shied away from taking a stand on current events. Between references to the recent terrorist attacks in Manchester and London to the polarizing political climate in the States, this was definitely a show reflective of Trump’s America (as the original was of Reagan’s). While not as outright antagonistic as Waters’s current Us & Them tour, 2017’s The Joshua Tree has plenty to say about the corrosive effect of ideological division and the abuse of power. Bono most certainly had his soapbox moments during the show, so depending on how tolerant you are of politics and sloganeering mixed with your entertainment, you either found it engaging or tedious. Again, nobody at Sunday’s show looked too bothered by it all, but it did skirt with heavy-handedness at times. Though their intention is more humanitarian than political, it was sometimes a bit much.

Once they finished the Joshua set, the band came back for a few encores (is it even fair to call them encores anymore when they are clearly built into every set?), mostly a condensed run-through of greatest hits including “Beautiful Day,” a crowd-pumping “Elevation,” and “One”. And in an effective piece of theatrical symmetry, the band closed the show on the B stage with the new “The Little Things That Give You Away”. It was a well-planned bookend that shifted the focus away from spectacle and back to the four band members and its fans. It also pointed the way past nostalgia to U2’s imminent future.

Overall, the tour will prove to be another in a long list of triumphs for U2. The audience clearly got what it came for, but in the process was also challenged a bit. This wasn’t just a feel-good rock show. It made you think, whether you wanted to or not. The show also felt oddly intimate considering the capacity audience of over 60,000 at Soldier Field. The inclusion and unity that U2 have always preached was brought to life. In essence, U2 is really the world’s most successful Christian rock band and one does get the sense of a travelling revival on display at their shows with Bono, the evangelist with the Christ complex, preaching from the largest pulpit possible. Thankfully, they have great songs for the faithful masses to sing along with, anthems that are now as much a part of the fabric of America as the dualities that first planted the seeds of The Joshua Tree.

Euphoria Mourning

In my time of dying I want nobody to mourn
All I want for you to do is take my body home
Well well well, so I can die easy
– “In My Time of Dying” by Led Zeppelin

 

As 2017 began, I had hoped the black plague of untimely rock star deaths that blighted most of the previous year had come and gone. Sadly, that is not the case. On Thursday, May 18th I woke to the news of Chris Cornell’s tragic death at the age of 52. To say I was shocked is an understatement. While the dark and depressing details had yet to emerge that morning, Chris Cornell is one of the last iconic musicians I would have ever pegged for an early, self-destructive exit. Yes, he emerged from a music scene rife with premature deaths (Andrew Wood, Layne Staley, Kurt Cobain). Yes, the music that defined “grunge” was the sound of existential misery and the fight for meaning in a meaningless world. Yes, that music was born in Seattle, a city known for its endless rain and high-depression and suicide rates. And yes, Soundgarden’s song catalog was almost exclusively a paean to the dark side of life: “Fell on Black Days,” “Let Me Drown,” “Ugly Truth,” “Blow Up the Outside World,” “Zero Chance,” “The Day I Tried to Live,” “Black Hole Sun” and, most prophetically, “Like Suicide” and “Pretty Noose”. Yet for all the creative alliances with his shadow self, Cornell never came across as outwardly tortured as his contemporary Kurt Cobain (or even a young Eddie Vedder for that matter). He’d had his battles with addiction and the music business during the crazy heights of the ‘90s grunge scene and his first marriage to manager Susan Silver ended in bitter divorce, but he somehow survived pretty much intact and externally none the worse for wear. He was part of the Mount Rushmore of grunge (along with Staley, Cobain and Vedder) and had navigated a career that now encompassed the best of all creative worlds. He’d also managed to find stability and, by all outward appearances, genuine happiness in marriage and fatherhood the second time around. For his legion of passionate fans, this is where the mysteries truly begin.

I’ve been a huge Chris Cornell fan ever since the early ‘90s. Weaned on classic rock, it was so refreshing after years and years of being subjected to party clown hair metal and the dance pop of MC Hammer, Vanilla Ice, and C+C Music Factory on constant radio and MTV rotation, to watch the alternative music scene explode and wipe the slate clean. For all the labels like “grunge” and “alternative,” it was essentially the return of guitar-driven rock; this time, from the perspective of the disenfranchised. It was also the return of socially conscious sensitivity in the songwriting, with genuine rage and indignation defining most of the anthems of the era like “Smells Like Teen Spirit,” and “Jeremy”. While never as fully mainstream as Nirvana and Pearl Jam, Soundgarden were the true pioneers of the Seattle scene and musically more diverse, virtuosic, and hard-hitting. Using complicated time signatures and muddy, droning guitar tunings, the band rocked harder and heavier than pretty much all of their contemporaries. With influences ranging from Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin to psychedelic-era Beatles, Soundgarden sounded both current and classic at the same time. And then of course, there was The Voice.

Chris Cornell could sing. Really sing. Having picked up the mantle of ‘70s-era Robert Plant, Cornell’s voice could be startling in its raw, operatic power. It was a voice that enthralled both men and women equally. I was blessed to see Chris perform live during Soundgarden’s reunion era and his solo acoustic shows and can readily attest to the visceral and enrapturing spell of his singing. He was the real deal and to share a room in his magnetic presence is something I will never forget. He also had incredible depth as an artist. While his rock and roll vocal chops are unquestioned and respected by all peers, Chris was equally rooted in R&B and folk, genres he would explore throughout his solo career following the dissolution of Soundgarden after 1996’s Down on the Upside. The sensitive singer-songwriter side would emerge in his contribution to the Singles movie soundtrack (“Seasons”) and his first solo album, 1999’s Euphoria Morning (re-titled Euphoria Mourning in recent reissues due to Cornell’s original intention, the album is filled with many undiscovered gems like “Moonchild,” “Sweet Euphoria” and “Steel Rain”). He would also band together with members of then-defunct Rage Against the Machine to form Audioslave. The supergroup would produce a string of memorable fan favorites like the blistering “Cochise,” “Like a Stone,” “I Am the Highway” and “Be Yourself”.

For 2007’s solo Carry On, he tapped into his R&B side, with the great takeaway being his epic cover of Michael Jackson’s “Billy Jean”. He crashed and burned with 2009’s Scream, an ill-conceived foray into Timbaland-produced EDM. As a fan of Prince and soul music, Cornell experimented with taking his vocal gifts into completely new sonic terrain, but to his longtime rock base it seemed like he’d lost his mind, chasing then-current music trends (and bad ones at that). Scream was very poorly received, but in hindsight is the only creative dud in his entire catalog, an incredible fact for someone with his output and longevity.

Personally I am thankful for the Scream album, as the critical and commercial failure seemed to refocus him. Not long after, Cornell reunited with the members of Soundgarden for a tour that soon re-kindled the creative spark in the group. They followed the reunion tour with a strong (and unexpectedly final) studio album, 2012’s King Animal, and would tour off and on until the night of Chris’s passing. He also managed to balance life in Soundgarden (and a brief Temple of the Dog reunion) with his ongoing, and equally compelling, solo career. It was the ideal Neil Young career model, being both rocker and acoustic troubadour, which both Cornell and Vedder followed faithfully. His solo acoustic tours produced 2011’s Songbook, a live album keepsake of truly stunning performances, especially set opener “As Hope and Promise Fade”. The acoustic jones would also produce his final and arguably best solo album, 2015’s Higher Truth. Filled with bittersweet poetry and organic arrangements that blanketed his still-unmatched vocals, Higher Truth was a creative triumph and one last excavation of deep insight, heartache and ultimately love from an often underrated master.

As further details surfaced throughout Thursday and Friday about Chris’s death, the story became even more heart wrenching. At the same time, the myth-making media machinery went into overdrive. There were the cryptic final Facebook and Twitter posts (fans will forever read into the #nomorebullshit hashtag in Cornell’s final tweet). During “Slaves & Bulldozers,” the final song of Soundgarden’s Wednesday night set in Detroit (Rock City of all places), Cornell slipped in the refrain from Led Zeppelin’s “In My Time of Dying”. While the official cause of death is listed as suicide (by hanging) with rampant speculation about the amount of prescription medication involved, it still leaves a black hole of uncertainty as to how much, if any, premeditation was involved. Did Chris plan on taking his life that night? Was it just the result of one too many Ativan’s (an anxiety medication often prescribed to former addicts)? It’s still too soon to know, but certain things do not add up and probably never will. The real answers died with Chris that night.

For me personally, it ultimately doesn’t matter what really happened. Whatever it was that led to Chris’s demise, it still comes down to a tragic end for a gifted and brilliant artist – one of the best of my generation. While my own shadow side would love to know and understand what was on Chris’s mind that final night after show time, the answers might already be staring me in the face in the rich, deep and slightly tortured legacy of his art. His words and music triumph over the demons that ultimately took him away. The same finely tuned sensitivity it takes to create work of this caliber can also make life itself quite unbearable. Whether or not that was Cornell’s final dilemma remains to be seen (or not). All I have now is gratitude for what he gifted me through his incredible songs and performances. Looking like the long-haired rock god he was to the very end, Chris Cornell gave us everything he had before slipping off into the Superunknown. From the bottom of my heart Chris, I thank you for the trail you left behind.

 

Won’t you take one link from this misery chain
Keep it to remind you of a long forgotten time or a place
So that you recognize it ‘til it’s understood
And that every trace of this misery chain is gone for good
‘til every trace of this misery chain is gone for good
Chris Cornell (1964-2017)

 

 

 

 

Review: You Want It Darker – Leonard Cohen

Another tablet of grim mortality and haunting beauty from the master

Continuing a late-career renaissance that began with his return to the concert stage in 2008, Leonard Cohen is redefining the creative life span of the singer-songwriter. At 82, Cohen has just released his latest album You Want It Darker, a collection teeming with poetic, bittersweet power.  Following 2012’s excellent Old Ideas and 2014’s solid Popular Problems, Cohen continues to delve deeper into his obsessions (spirituality, mortality, relationships gone wrong) with the unwavering eyes of a man who knows his time is running out.

The album opens with the title track, an instantly classic Cohen meditation that manages to sound atmospheric, sinister, and sensual all at once. Cohen’s voice is now far removed from the one that was featured quite meekly on 1967’s Songs of Leonard Cohen.  His gravelly baritone now carries the weight of deep authority and hard-earned wisdom. It is not for everyone and certainly not a Top 40 staple, but it’s become a distinctive signature that fully compliments his writing style. When he sings “I’m ready my Lord,” with the gravity and resignation so clear in his delivery, it is like the encapsulation of his entire body of work and personal quest.

Produced by his son Adam, along with longtime collaborator Patrick Leonard, You Want It Darker benefits from simple, tasteful arrangements that wisely place Cohen’s voice and poetry front-and-center. Each song is ruminative in a way only Cohen can pull off: the sacred and the suffering all delivered with biting wit as on “Leaving the Table,” where he bids adieu to his infamous ladies’ man persona with the words “I don’t need a lover/The wretched beast is tame.” On “Treaty,” he owns up to the existential angst of his years by admitting “I’m angry and I’m tired all the time.”  This is not easy listening, but that is not what the Cohen faithful seek.

Along with the pervasive gloom (or simply the mood of mortality now fully felt and expressed), Cohen also writes with characteristically heartbreaking beauty: “If I Didn’t Have Your Love” might be about a lover or about God (or both), but the haunting images of desolation and darkness only serve to underscore how lost the singer would be “if I didn’t have your love to make it real.” As on the album cover, Cohen might be ready to step into the light, but he still has one arm draped over the darkness. If You Want It Darker is Cohen’s final artistic statement, it is a faithful and uncompromising summation of all that has come before and a shining inspiration to any artist in search of longevity and relevance well into seniority.